Blog

 | by
Emily Rusch
Executive Director

The state legislature has given Californians a number of good reasons to ring in the new year. Starting Jan. 1, Golden State residents will have more tools to avoid toxic chemicals, predatory loans and unwanted data collection and manipulation. California will also have more options to hold companies accountable for failing to adequately protect consumers and more choices for registering and voting in elections. Over the past three years, CALPIRG advocated for all these changes in the legislative process and, together with our allies, we prevailed despite staunch industry opposition in many cases. Here’s a digest of some of the game-changing new laws, supported by CALPIRG, going into effect on New Year’s Day. 

Get ready for some alarming stories—and they're all the more alarming because they're true.

On Nov. 14, U.S. PIRG and the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center (ARAC) of George Washington University launched "Superbugs Unplugged," a podcast that will dive into the alarming issue of antibiotic resistance and how we can slow it. Matt Wellington, our Stop the Overuse of Antibiotics campaign director, is co-hosting the podcast, along with Dr. Lance Price of ARAC. 

CalRecycle is holding a workshop on labeling requirements for products with batteries. CALPIRG wrote to request that consumer products be labeled as to whether or not the battery is replaceable, as too many modern products are made with no way to replace the battery making them essentially disposable. Read our letter. 

CalRecycle is holding a workshop on labeling requirements for products with batteries. CALPIRG wrote to request that consumer products be labeled as to whether or not the battery is replaceable, as too many modern products are made with no way to replace the battery making them essentially disposable. Read our letter. 

 | by
Ed Mierzwinski
Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program

Last week, Sens. Jack Reed (RI) and Chris Van Hollen (MD) introduced legislation to finally give consumers real control over our own credit reports. The Consumer Credit Control Act would change what Sen. Reed appropriately calls our “backwards” credit reporting system by helping to solve two problems. The Consumer Credit Control Act is a win-win for consumers. It improves their privacy and saves them money.

Walkers and bikers are getting killed at alarming rates -- at a time when we need this type of transportation more than ever. 

 | by
Ed Mierzwinski
Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program

CFPB Director Kathy Kraninger will deliver the statutory “Semi-Annual Report of the CFPB” to the House Financial Services (10/16) and Senate Banking (10/17) Committees next week. Here are some helpful questions for committee members to ask.

 

It's called "pay for delay": One prescription drug company pays another to keep a generic drug out of the marketplace.

The next time you move to a new home, you may be able to register to vote and cast a ballot on the same day, thanks to CALPIRG-backed legislation.

We know that exposure to lead can affect how our children learn, think and behave. Yet every day, California kids go to schools where the drinking water is contaminated by lead.